Geography

Seasons


We call the season each of the four subdivisions of the year based on weather patterns. They are: spring, summer, autumn and winter.

The seasons occur due to the slope of the earth in relation to the sun. We can then say that the seasons are caused by the earth's axis of rotation, along with its motion around the sun, which lasts for a year and is called translational.

See below the characteristics of each of them.

Spring

(from Latin: cousin vere, early summer)

It begins after winter (approximately March 20 in the Northern Hemisphere and September 23 in the Southern Hemisphere) and its successor is Summer (ends approximately June 21 in the Northern Hemisphere and December 21 in the Southern Hemisphere).

The main feature of spring is the revival of terrestrial flora and fauna.

Summer

(from common Latin: veranum, veranuns tempus, spring or spring time)

It begins after spring (approximately June 21 in the Northern Hemisphere and December 21 in the Southern Hemisphere) and its successor is Autumn (ends approximately on September 23 in the Northern Hemisphere and March 21 in the Southern Hemisphere).

During this period, temperatures remain high and days are longer.

Autumn

(from Latin autumno)

It begins after summer (approximately September 23 in the Northern Hemisphere and March 22 in the Southern Hemisphere) and its successor is Winter (ends approximately on December 21 in the Northern Hemisphere and June 20 in the Southern Hemisphere).

In this season, the days get shorter and fresher. The leaves and fruits are ripe and beginning to fall. The gardens and parks are covered in leaves of all sizes and colors.

Winter

(from Latin: hibernu, tempus hibernus, hibernal time)

It begins after autumn (approximately December 21st in the Northern Hemisphere and June 21st in the Southern Hemisphere) and its successor is Spring (ends approximately March 21st in the Northern Hemisphere and September 23rd in the Southern Hemisphere).

The main characteristic of winter is the drop in temperature, which may vary in some regions well below 0 ° C, even in Brazil.